Halflife

by EPROM

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isaac clark
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isaac clark I love the references to drexciya in the song titles as well as some of the sounds used in the tracks. Especially in moisture. Favorite track: Moisture.
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about

With barely one year since the release of his debut, West coast producer and sound system murderer Eprom is back on Rwina for a second album, Halflife. Such a quick return to the long player format could be seen as an affirmation of the old ‘you have your whole life to write a debut album…’ maxim, though in an age of sound bite music and easily digestible digital releases it’s more testament to Eprom’s creative drive and need to create a sonic space that only he can inhabit.

Halflife continues the producer’s mad scientist approach to what makes a dancefloor move: synthetizing the warmth of vintage computer sounds, the energy of African rhythmic traditions (including modern evolutions such as Kwaito and Shangaan Electro), the swagger of southern rap and the intricacy of pioneering electronic music from the likes of Richard Devine or Curtis Roads. The result is a heady melting pot, a unique sound that has some of the best DJs in the world – Gaslamp Killer, Kutmah, D-Styles – and the crowds always wanting more.

Wasting no time, Eprom opens the album with a volley of tracks built to blow up sound systems and take heads off in the dance. Center of the Sun, Beasts of Babylon and Hurricane all display the sheer brilliance of Eprom’s mad scientist streak: a minimalist blend of low slung rhythmic alchemy, ten ton heavy bass and dark melodies more powerful than the soulless, over-the-top showboating that characterises much of today’s dance music. On the bouncy Vogel he revisits some of the melodic elements from the first album while Super FX and Lost Levels come across like 2013 dancefloor versions of a Final Fantasy soundtrack, introducing a focus on brighter melodies and variations. Screwface opens the second half of the album with more in-your-face brilliance as drums pound the bass bins into submission before Machine Skin rolls in with its hypnotic arpeggio to lead dancers around like a demented Pied Piper. Pentatonic Dust then provides a brief and blurry interlude before another trio of short tracks – Moisture, Turtle Ride and Subroc – deliver a perfect blend of what’s come before: mesmerising melodies, energetic rhythms and chest-pounding sub frequencies. The album closes with Cloud Leanmixx bringing the journey to an end by stripping back some of the energy and enveloping the listener in a warm blanket of synths and rolling drums.

In many ways Halflife unfolds like an Eprom live set: taking you places you hadn’t expected, showing you potentials for dance music you hadn’t thought possible before taking you back to reality. The benefit of the album is that once it’s finished you can press play and do it all over again.

credits

released October 14, 2013

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Rwina Records Amsterdam, Netherlands

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